Is this word British or American?

 

 

There are different types of people and you cannot categorize all of them into a single category. So assuming you have a certain personality type but it doesn’t suit where you are currently living. Your manners, habits might be well suited for altogether a different nationality. Hence you should consider moving to a different nation altogether. But if you belong to a lower income class please don’t consider moving as you might face financial woes.

If you still feel that you should move out of the country then you are free to do so. But I would advise against it. Budget is one of the first things that should come to your mind when you are planning to move out of your country. You may break your bank if you move to a country with a very high cost of living then you might face issues.

“Emotions, in my experience, aren’t covered by single words. I don’t believe in “sadness,” “joy,” or “regret.” Maybe the best proof that the language is patriarchal is that it oversimplifies feeling. I’d like to have at my disposal complicated hybrid emotions, Germanic train-car constructions like, say, “the happiness that attends disaster.” Or: “the disappointment of sleeping with one’s fantasy.” I’d like to show how “intimations of mortality brought on by aging family members” connects with “the hatred of mirrors that begins in middle age.” I’d like to have a word for “the sadness inspired by failing restaurants” as well as for “the excitement of getting a room with a minibar.” I’ve never had the right words to describe my life, and now that I’ve entered my story, I need them more than ever. ”
― Jeffrey Eugenides, Middlesex

“The English language is like London: proudly barbaric yet deeply civilised, too, common yet royal, vulgar yet processional, sacred yet profane. Each sentence we produce, whether we know it or not, is a mongrel mouthful of Chaucerian, Shakespearean, Miltonic, Johnsonian, Dickensian and American. Military, naval, legal, corporate, criminal, jazz, rap and ghetto discourses are mingled at every turn. The French language, like Paris, has attempted, through its Academy, to retain its purity, to fight the advancing tides of Franglais and international prefabrication. English, by comparison, is a shameless whore.”
― Stephen Fry, The Ode Less Travelled: Unlocking the Poet Within

“Of course, it is boring to read about boring thing, but it is better to read something that makes you yawn with boredom than something that will make you weep uncontrollably, pound your fists against the floor, and leave tearstains all over your pillowcase, sheets, and boomerang collection.”
― Lemony Snicket, The Grim Grotto

“My father was English. He date-raped my mother so she’s hated English men ever since. You know my boyfriend’s English, and I’m, uh, I’m half-English, which she’s never been real happy about. If she finds out I’m dating someone English, she’ll ah, think I’ turning my back on her and becoming a foreigner.’
Cathy, that’s the stupidest reason I’ve ever heard.”
― Jeaniene Frost, Halfway to the Grave


“Start the Quiz”

  • Question of

    Some use the word ‘rad’ to mean ‘very good,’ but from where do you think comes?

    • America
    • Britain
  • Question of

    Some things are just very ‘twee,’ but from which place does that word originate?

    • America
    • Britain
  • Question of

    Which nation incorporated the word ‘maven’ into English?

    • America
    • Britain
  • Question of

    If you can ‘envision’ something, which nation should you thank for the verb you’re enacting?

    • America
    • Britain
  • Question of

    Which nation can ‘grifters’ thank for giving them their name?

    • America
    • Britain
  • Question of

    Where would we be without the eggplant emoji? More importantly, who gave us the word ‘eggplant’?

    • America
    • Britain
  • Question of

    What nation’s accent would you expect from someone who called you a ‘numpty’?

    • America
    • Britain
  • Question of

    If someone suggested a return to ‘normalcy,’ where could you assume they come from?

    • America
    • Britain
  • Question of

    What place is the origin of the ‘freshman’?

    • America
    • Britain
  • Question of

    Lots of people have ‘trainers,’ but this is one you wear. Where does this use of ‘trainer’ come from?

    • America
    • Britain
  • Question of

    Which country gave the world the term ‘nightstick’?

    • America
    • Britain
  • Question of

    Without any relation to the term for a kind of cash, what nation gave the world the term ‘sawbuck’?

    • America
    • Britain
  • Question of

    ‘Rubber’ can mean any rubber shoe covering used in the rain. In which place is it used that way?

    • America
    • Britain
  • Question of

    An ‘anorak’ is a kind of jacket or coat one wears in the rain. What nation counts that word as normal vocabulary?

    • America
    • Britain
  • Question of

    On a sartorial excursion, you are offered a ‘waistcoat.’ Is that term British or American?

    • American
    • British

Can you get 15/15 on this impossible Trivia Quiz?

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