Which American Accent do you have?

 

According to a research which included 172 German adults out of which 63 percent were females and 60 percent students; the outcome matched the above mentioned information. Tested with personalities questionnaires these candidates levels of preference for a dominant partner was evaluated. With four sub scales which are mentioned, majority of the candidates put emphasis on their attraction levels for a partner who is much more assertive, controlling and decisive.

– thrill and adventure seeking: partners who are adventurous, fearless and engage in activities which involves risk for instance skydiving and mountain climbing.

– disinhibition: partners who make impulsive decisions or engage in impulsive behaviours like drug or alcohol use or unsafe sex.

– experience seeking: involving partners who take less risk but are open to new possibilities and experiences. These can be related to ravel or something else.

– boredom susceptibility: such people are more probable to boredom hence require entertainment every now and then, it could be in form of attention, validation or acknowledgement.

Sensation seekers be it whichever gender preferred a partner who is dominant, and so were people belonging to boredom susceptibility and disinhibition levels, whereas thrill-seeking people had no such preference related to dominant partners. This states that people more likely to get bored seed entertainment factors which they could find in dominant partners. On evaluating the anxiety levels of the candidates it was observed that people with high anxiety levels preferred dominant partners because of the sense of security they bring a long.

“Her accent’s funny, different from mine, different from anyone in Prentisstown’s. Her lips make different kinds of outlines for the letters, like they’re swooping down on them from above, pushing them into shape, telling them what to say. In Prentisstown, everyone talks like they’re sneaking up on their words, ready to club them from behind.”
― Patrick Ness, The Knife of Never Letting Go

“Something tugged inside him. A flutter of unease.
Do you sing? Those had been her first words to him, the day she had bought him.
A band of nausea circled Arin’s throat, just as it had when she had asked him that question, in part for the same reason.
She’d had no trace of an accent. She had spoken in perfect, natural, mother-taught Herrani.”
― Marie Rutkoski, The Winner’s Kiss

“What is surprising, even deeply disturbing, is the way that many individuals who consider themselves democratic, even-handed, rational, and free of prejudice, hold on tenaciously to a standard language ideology which attempts to justify restriction of individuality and rejection of the Other”
― Rosina Lippi-Green

“Do you have one where you’re riding a horse or a camel? Or sitting on a rocket ship? Those are always wildly popular with men looking for sex.
—SINGLE-MINDED”
― Lisa Daily, Single-Minded


“Start the Quiz”

  • Question of

    What is your age?

    • Under 18 Years Old
    • 18 to 24 Years Old
    • 25 to 30 Years Old
    • 31 to 40 Years Old
    • 41 to 50 Years Old
    • 51 to 60 Years Old
    • Over 60 Years Old
  • Question of

    What is your gender?

    • Male
    • Female
  • Question of

    We’re going to start with two ordinary words, ‘cot’ and ‘caught.’ Do you think those words sound the same or different?

    • Same
    • Different
    • Same, no wait I mean different, well, I don’t know…
  • Question of

    What about ‘don’ and ‘dawn’?

    • Same
    • Different
    • Same…ish. Maybe a little different.
  • Question of

    OK, what about ‘stock’ and ‘stalk’?

    • Same
    • Different
    • Almost, but not quite, the same
  • Question of

    Now then how do ‘collar’ and ‘caller’ sound?

    • Same
    • Different
    • Almost, but not quite, the same
  • Question of

    Do you think the word ‘on’ rhymes with ‘dawn’ or with ‘don’?

    • dawn
    • don
    • Well, I don’t think don and dawn sound any different in the first place so on would obviously rhyme with both
  • Question of

    Moving on, what do you think about ‘Mary,’ ‘merry,’ and ‘marry’?

    • All 3 sound different
    • Mary and merry sound the same but marry is different from them
    • All 3 sound the same
  • Question of

    Our next word is ‘horrible.’ How does that first vowel sound?

    • It’s just like in the word ‘whore.’
    • It’s the same ‘o’ sound as in ‘hot.’
    • Neither one
  • Question of

    Now for ‘pen’ and ‘pin.’ Don’t worry about what others say is correct, just tell us how they come out in an ordinary conversation.

    • Same
    • Different
    • Close. Pen sounds almost, but not quite, like pin.
  • Question of

    What about ‘feel’ and ‘fill’?

    • Same
    • Different
    • Well, I think they’re different even though they sound very, very similar almost to the point of being the same
  • Question of

    When you say ‘about,’ does the ‘ou’ sound like the ‘ou’ in ‘loud’?

    • No
    • Yes
  • Question of

    Last question. When you say ‘bag’ does it rhyme with ‘vague’?

    • Yes
    • No
  • Question of

    What do you call a side of French fries with gravy and cheese?

    • Poutine
    • Cheese fries
    • Disco fries
    • Fries with cheese
  • Question of

    What’s the correct term for more than one person with whom you are familiar?

    • You’s guys
    • Ya guys
    • You guys
    • Y’all

Myers Briggs: Are you Judging or Perceiving?

How will you die?